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Help May Be On The Way For Texas’ Power Grid

TXU ProblemsAs most Texans know, Mother Nature can be severe at times. February 2011 was brutally cold, and ERCOT had to resort to rolling blackouts across the state for several days because our electricity production capabilities were not able to keep up with demand. That same year had an extremely hot summer, and rolling blackouts were narrowly avoided, though we had to purchase power from several states and even from Mexico in order to keep the lights on.

Texas is unique to all of the other lower 48 states in that we have our own power grid. The rest of the continous states receive their power from two electric grids, one for the eastern half of the US and one for the western half.

Up to this point, Texas has tried to stay independent from the other two grids in order to avoid federal oversight. Although we currently have a few lines connecting outside the state, Texas may soon have to increase its cross-border connections in order to avoid future blackouts.

One proposal that is currently on the table is called Tres Amigas, and would cost an estimated $2 billion. The plan would allow a New Mexico facility to connect to all three power grids of the lower 48 states, though the Texas connection would be added after the connection of the eastern and western grids.

Another proposal, the Southern Cross, would also cost about $2 billion and it would include a trasmission line that could move electricity from the Tennessee Valley Authority to East Texas and Mississippi.

Other ideas are currently being batted around, but clearly something needs to be done. As it currently stands, Texas can only bring in enough electricity from outside the state to handle 1.5% of our peak demand. Although we certainly do not want more federal regulators overseeing our every move, we have to take steps to make sure we don’t have to endure rolling blackouts every time Mother Nature reminds us of her power.