University of Texas-San Antonio Releases Report on Economic Impact of Eagle Ford Shale

In a report released by the University of Texas-San Antonio (UTSA) entitled “Economic Impact of the Eagle Ford Shale”, researchers from the Center for Community and Business Research at the University’s Institute for Economic Development found that extraction of oil, condensate, and natural gas from the Eagle Ford Shale in South Texas generated over $87 billion in total economic output for Texas in 2013, including $42.8 billion in gross regional product for the 21 counties involved in the study.

In 2013, shale activity from Eagle Ford provided over $4.4 billion to state and local governments and supported almost 155,000 jobs, and UTSA projected that over the next ten years, the industry will support as many as 196,660 full-time-equivalent jobs and generate more than $137 billion for the region, far exceeding the $89 billion originally projected for 2022 in last March’s report. UTSA explains that the upward adjustment was a result of a continued rise in production that has exceeded expectations, as well as growth in the development of support industries such as refineries, processing and ports, among others.

Production from the Eagle Ford Shale has grown exponentially; oil and condensate production rose from 581 barrels per day in 2008 to over 1.1 million barrels per day as of June 2014, and natural gas production puts up equally impressive numbers, at more than 4 billion cubic feet per day. The report covers 21 counties that benefit economically from development in the Eagle Ford Shale; in addition to the 15 most directly-involved counties, in which 3,311 wells were actively producing in 2013, there are six surrounding counties that have seen a boom in economic growth from the development of related service and support industries.

The forecast for continued healthy growth has attracted more capital investment to Eagle Ford than to any other shale field in the country. Robert McKinley, UTSA Associate VP for Economic Development, said the revenue would provide the ability to develop and improve infrastructure that would benefit rural communities, such as roads, schools, broadband internet, and medical facilities. The report cautions that these infrastructure improvements are vital to the sustainability of communities in the region and recommends that community leaders should actively partner with state legislators to ensure that those communities can get support from revenue sources such as the Economic Stabilization Fund and from allowable city and county taxes.

The report also recommends that area communities should consider aesthetics, as well, and perhaps attempt diversification in less industrial-feeling investments, like olive farming and olive oil production, tourism, and recreation, to keep their surroundings attractive and enjoyable. Keeping the needs of local residents in mind rather than just focusing on the very impressive numbers will ensure that stability and economic success are long-lasting not just for investors, but for the whole community.

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